18491616_1137807429696441_1406713874176294843_o.jpg
8338643f42f22326853988409cc1162b.jpg
18491616_1137807429696441_1406713874176294843_o.jpg

Weapons of War


SCROLL DOWN

Weapons of War


 

Weapons of War

World War 1 represented many things but foremost among them was innovation. Since the dawn of time, man has always sought to find better ways to create destruction and World War 1 saw the frightening cost of mixing modern technology and outdated tactics.

 
UIWepLeeEnfieldSMLE-c4c333c6.png

Entente

SMLE No1 MkIII

The standard issue rifle of all British Empire forces, including the ANZACs, this rifle represented the latest in weapons technology. Firing the stout .303 inch round and featuring a 10 round magazine, the Lee Enfield had double the ammunition with double the fire rate of the Mauser thanks to a speedy bolt mechanism. During the Battle of Mons in 1914, several German infantry accounts reported being fired on by several machine gun companies when really, they were only facing a British force armed with this rife and performing a technique called the, 'Mad Minute,' which allows a rifleman to shoot incredibly quickly.

 
UIWepLewisMG-3202f5a3.png

Lewis Gun

This light machine gun differed from the Vickers and MG08 guns as it was portable. While on the offensive, Lewisgunners would charge forward and set up forward positions taking advantage of this weapon's mobility. Designed by an American inventor, Isaac Newton Lewis, this weapon fired the same .303 round as the British Lee Enfield rifle and was air-cooled.

 
latest.png

Webley auto revolver

British officers were always allowed to buy their own sidearms and by far one of the most popular choices was this handgun. This revolver had seen reliable service in the British Army for decades and was used in many significant battles such as Rorke's Drift during the Zulu Wars. This tried and true reputation saw many British officers electing to take this powerful revolver with them into battle. Did it help them against the well defended German lines, the artillery, machine guns and gas? No. However it was a popular ratting weapon. British officers developed a strong hatred for rats especially when they used to lick the brilliantine (an old form of hair gel) out of their hair while they slept! So conversations in the officer's dugout would often be punctuated by quick shots at passing rats.

8338643f42f22326853988409cc1162b.jpg

Central Powers


Central Powers


 
 
 
310-9.png

Central Powers

Mauser Gewehr 98

Germany was known for producing incredible hunters, armed with this advanced, reliable rifle able to cope with the mud of the trenches-there was many a deadly marksman in the German lines. Firing a very powerful, 8mm round, this rifle was used over long distances.

 
310-8.png

maschinengewehr 08

A copy of the British Maxim gun, the MG08 was the main Machine gun of the German Empire and was a common defensive weapon. It was water cooled which allowed it to shoot for a very long time without overheating. This was a truly devastating weapon that contributed to many young men losing their lives on the Entente side.

 
310.png

Pistole 1908

Adapted from the first successful semi-automatic pistol, the C93 Borchardt, this pistol invented by Georg J. Luger is iconic. This weapon was held only by officers in the German Army and was a prized trophy taken during nighttime trench raids by allied forces.